Tag Archives: Twitter

Why are people I don’t even know adding me as a friend on Foursquare?

What is the deal with people that don’t even know me trying to add me as a friend on Foursquare? I use Foursquare to check-in and share with my friends and family certain activities like dinner at a nice restaurant or visiting a Microsoft Store. When I check-in on Foursquare, those check-in’s can be seen by people I am friends with on Foursquare and also on Facebook as I share check-ins to Facebook as well. But I only want to share this with my friends and family – not at random with just anyone. Sharing my location isn’t like sending out a tweet that can be read by anyone anywhere on Twitter. I’m trying to understand the “why” behind getting random friend requests from people I don’t know on Foursquare. Why would a person feel the need to know where I am checking in – especially if they have never interacted with me ever online or in person? It just doesn’t make sense to me. Location-based social networking is meant, in my opinion, to be more refined and focused around close personal friends and family. It is not meant to be used in the same fashion as say Twitter is where something you tweet can be viewed so broadly. And if I ever were to want to publish a check-in and have it seen by just about anybody, I’d share it on Twitter. So… to all those random people trying to add me as a friend on Foursquare please stop. Your best bet for connect with me is by following me on Twitter. Your friend request on Foursquare will be ignored.

P.S. I wrote a blog post last year about staying safe while checking in online. The post is definitely worth a read for those of you diving into location-based social networking like Foursquare.

New season of Nerd Trivia has begun!

On August 9th last week, a new season of Nerd Trivia kicked off from @NerdTrivia.

nerdtrivialogo

Nerd Trivia is an interactive trivia game that is played over Twitter. The questions specifically target nerd/geek content such as movies, TV shows, and games. Nerd Trivia is a side project by work colleague and friend Laura Massey (@lauralollipop). Throughout the day, trivia questions are asked via @NerdTrivia and followers have a certain amount of time to answer the question to earn points and achievements. You can find out more about Nerd Trivia at the Nerd Trivia website that recently launched with the current season. I think this is a really cool concept and I am helping Laura with supplying nerdy questions for people to answer which is exciting! I have endless amounts of Star Trek trivia and lot’s more of completely random nerdy movies and TV shows. Special thanks to Laura for letting me take part in this really cool project of hers.

So all you nerds and geeks out there – follow @NerdTrivia and start answering the trivia questions! Let’s see what you got!

Why RSS is still important (today)

I hear a lot about how RSS is no longer important (e.g. subscribing to an RSS feed of a blog) now that everyone gets their information from Twitter or Facebook these days. While I agree that most people get their information from social networks like Twitter today than they do “subscribing” to an RSS feed – I do disagree that RSS isn’t important, at least today. It’s just less important for the average person visiting a blog (or website) but its still very important to the existence of a blog. Let me explain why.

The problem with RSS was that it never quite got to the point where it was something easily understood by the average person visiting a blog. My mom would never understand the concept of “subscribing” to an RSS feed of a blog or “subscribing to a blog”. It was easier for them to just add that blog to their Favorites (or Bookmarks) in their browser so they can revisit in the future. Along comes Twitter and Facebook which makes it extremely easy for people to consume information and easy for bloggers to push their blog posts out for people to read. The average person understands the concept of following someone on Twitter. Following someone could mean following a person or following a website. Most websites today automatically push their blog posts out to at least Twitter. And that’s where most people consume the content people blog.

But with bloggers pushing their content to Twitter – do you really think there is someone manually tweeting when a new post is published?

No.

At least not likely.

This is where RSS comes in.

Social networks today have become quite good at aggregating information from a variety of sources – including RSS. It’s almost a standard option. There are a bunch of services offered in Twitter’s extensive ecosystem that will take your blog’s RSS feed and automatically tweet it. My favorite is Twitterfeed. And both Facebook and Windows Live offer the ability for you to configure an RSS feed to bring in anything you publish to your blog and display it in your news feed. As a blogger and someone who runs a few blogs, I want to be able to push my content out to the major social networks for people to consume and as easily as possible. Today RSS allows me to do that.

RSS today is more important to content publishers like bloggers than it is to anyone else. It is very important for pushing blog content out to important services like Twitter, Facebook, or Windows Live for people to consume their content. It’s just no longer important for bloggers to recommend people “subscribe” to their blogs. Instead, the recommendation is to follow them (the blogger or blog) on Twitter.

Side note: The advantage to Twitter that is really exciting to me as a blogger is that its much more interactive. My Twitter feed is a place I can push my content to people that follow me but also interact with them and discuss my content beyond the comments section of my blog.

Now I say RSS is important today. It may not be very important in the future though. Actually, it probably won’t. If you look at Twitter, Facebook, Windows Live, and other social networks like Foursquare – they are all developing APIs that web developers can use to tap directly (and more integrate more deeply) into their services. Blog platforms are beginning to take advantage of this. Blogs and websites in general are looking at becoming more integrated into these services. In the future, it is likely a simple RSS feed won’t be enough. Actually – it won’t.

It will be interesting to watch this space in the next year or two.

Anybody know of a major website that is no longer publicly offering an RSS feed but instead asks their readers to follow them on Twitter or “like” their Facebook Page?

Twitter’s Tweet Button

I’ve added Twitter’s new Tweet Button (see details in their blog post here) to my blog. This button makes it easier to quickly share a post to all your friends on Twitter. For bloggers, Twitter is an excellent resource for getting exposure to blog content they write.

UPDATE: I tested the Tweet Button myself. Doesn’t seem to be showing the number of “tweets” that have been posted from the button although if I click on the number “O” it shows my test. Weird. Not sure what the deal is.

UPDATE 2: Now it seems to be working. It seems there is a slight delay? Are others experiencing a delay in tweet counts?

Seesmic for Windows 0.5.2 released with bug fixes etc.

Tonight, Seesmic released Seesmic for Windows 0.5.2. This updated build is primarily bug fixes. You can get the low-down on on what this release consists of (on top of application performance) here in their blog post on the Seesmic Blog.

Download: Seesmic for Windows 0.5.2

If you have Seesmic for Windows already installed, you can update it by clicking the download link above.

Seesmic for Windows 0.5.2 

Seesmic announced that they are moving to the Windows Platform (essentially Seesmic for Windows is a “WPF app”) at PDC in November. You can read my blog post from The Windows Blog on Seesmic’s announcement and the first release of Seesmic for Windows.

Loic tells me that in early January, we can expect another release of Seesmic for Windows with new features and further improvements. I can’t wait!